Cash and Vouchers


WFP delivers hundreds of thousands of tons of food each year, but, increasingly, we give hungry people cash or vouchers to buy food for themselves.

Cash transfers provide money to people who are struggling to provide food for their families; vouchers can be redeemed for food items or “spent” in selected shops. They are used to tackle hunger in places where there is plenty of food in the marketplace but where poor people cannot afford to buy it.

Cash and vouchers can sometimes cut down the costs of transporting and storing food. They benefit the local economy, because beneficiaries spend the money in local markets. People often prefer cash and vouchers to traditional food assistance, because they offer more choice and variety.

WFP is using innovative ways to deliver the assistance, such as scratch cards or “e-vouchers” delivered to mobile phones by text message.
 

Cash and Vouchers - Stories

World Refugee Day In Ecuador: "Food Tastes Better when we are Together"

Through the Family Meal initiative, a project developed by the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), photographer Chris Terry travelled around the world in search of the ingredients of the family meal.  His journey took him to Ecuador’s northern border region, where he met eleven-year-old Ximena and her family shortly after they fled the armed conflict in Colombia and moved to Ecuador.
 

Philippines: Parent Volunteers In Dolores Thankful For Typhoon Ruby Cash Assistance

In December 2014, Typhoon Ruby (international name: Hagupit) first hit the municipality of Dolores, Eastern Samar in the Philippines. Ma. Lourdes ‘Ondith’ Senina and Ana Helen Docabo, residents of Dolores, share their experience during Hagupit and how they have gotten back on their feet with assistance from the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the World Food Programme (WFP).

Ecuadorian Women Harvest the Fruits of their Labour

Women living in the canton of Pimampiro north of Quito are taking action. After attempting to sell food grown in their home gardens, they soon saw that there existed few formal market opportunities in their communities and realized that they faced many challenges. The following article tells the story of a group of organized and united women farmers who created a space for themselves in their local market and who now provide food for WFP’s assistance programmes.

 

Fleeing Family Enjoys Taste Of Home In Northern Iraq

Since fleeing their home in August, Hanaa and her family have rarely had the chance to choose what food they eat—at least until recently. WFP food vouchers are now giving them and many other vulnerable Iraqi families the power to pick their own meals, bringing a measure of nornality into their lives.