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31 May 2012

Denise Brown, WFP's country director in Niger, talks to Nightline about the food crisis in the West African country where she works.


22 May 2012

Wars keep children out of school. So does sickness. But in Niger, a sun-baked land where drought occurs with alarming frequency, a major impediment to education is thirst and the long trek required to quench it. (..) The more they work, the emptier become the classrooms of eastern Niger.


10 May 2012

On the second day of her visit to the drought-hit country of Niger, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin met families who are providing for themselves by working on projects that will protect them from hunger down the line. (..) Travelling alongside UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres, the WFP chief sent back this blog post to tell us about her trip.


9 May 2012

Niger is the worst country on earth in which to be a mother, according to a report by Save the Children. The charity's annual Mothers' Index uses statistics covering female and child health and nutrition, as well as prospects for women's education, economic prosperity and political participation in its assessment of 165 countries.


8 May 2012

The executive director of the United Nations World Food Program says the international community "cannot and must not ignore" deepening food shortages in Niger, which are being aggravated by thousands of refugees fleeing fighting in northern Mali. (..) WFP's Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said this year's crisis in Niger is "even more complicated" than it has ever been in the past. "What you have is communities that are suffering from a failed harvest, so there is nothing in some markets. Where there is food in markets, because of high food prices, they can't afford it so they have no access," she said. "And, then you have the refugees coming into Niger.


7 May 2012

One month ago, during my first week in office as WFP's Executive Director, I began convening daily operational briefings. Since then, each and every briefing has included fresh and ever more disturbing details of the tragedy unfolding across Africa's Sahel region. Now, visiting Niger, I am witnessing first hand the human consequences of this complicated complex crisis. (..) Women and children across this hot dry land cannot access enough food to eat.


16 April 2012

The Sahel region of Africa is today suffering from drought and conflict. (..) The World Food Program (WFP), which relies on voluntary donations, lacks funding for this crisis. Denise Brown, the WFP director in Niger, says, "We do not have enough resources, cash or food, to cover the lean season." (..) On top of conflict, a drought has hit South Sudan. WFP says nearly 5 million people are suffering from hunger. (..) In Afghanistan, while donations from the U.S. and others have helped rescue the country from last year's massive drought, a $362 million relief and recovery operation by the WFP remains only 10 percent funded. (..) If we act now, we can save millions of lives in these areas.


16 April 2012

With drought conditions chronic in the Sahel, many farmers give up trying to grow crops and head to towns and cities to find work. (..) But some agro-ecologists say governments, donors and farmers should not abandon agriculture in the Sahel, and despite being “very difficult”, with the right approaches, there is “huge potential” in natural regeneration, traditional irrigation methods, and simple alternatives such as crop diversification.


28 March 2012

As Niger enters its annual "hunger season," efforts are being made by international aid agencies to try and prevent the country's food crisis turning into a famine. The BBC's Andrew Harding went to visit an initiative that is being run by the UN's World Food Programme, where he says women are trying to "push back the sands of the Sahara."


28 March 2012

As Niger enters its annual "hunger season," efforts are being made by international aid agencies to try and prevent the country's food crisis turning into a famine. The BBC's Andrew Harding went to visit an initiative that is being run by the UN's World Food Programme, where he says women are trying to "push back the sands of the Sahara."