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22 January 2010

Governments have pledged nearly $1 billion in aid to Haiti, according to an Associated Press estimate, including $575 million from the European Union's 27 nations. Those promises include:(..)Norway: $17.5 million in aid earmarked for the WFP(..)WFP: More than 250,000 ready-to-eat rations delivered. More than 10 million to arrive within the next week.


22 January 2010

The hunt for survivors of Haiti's earthquake slowed Thursday, but a humanitarian operation intensified, with relief workers sending food to imperiled orphans and truckloads of water and generators snarling traffic in the capital.(..)Christian Fortier, a logistics expert with the WFP, said the group was finally getting a steady supply of gasoline from the Dominican Republic and was finding more Haitian drivers now that cellphones were working.(..)Alejandro Lopez-Chicheri, a spokesman for the WFP, said the group's priorities include getting supplies to the 54 orphanages in the capital.


22 January 2010

Thousands of Haitians are continuing to flee the capital, Port-au-Prince, fearful of aftershocks and concerned at the bleak prospects for work and normal life following the deadly earthquake of January 12.(..)"We will probably need to feed between one to two million but it depends on the rate at which people leave the city," Thiry Benoit, WFP's deputy country representative in Haiti, said.


22 January 2010

UN-supported relief efforts to reach the countless victims of Haiti's devastating earthquake are expanding to areas away from Port-au- Prince to smaller towns and communities as aid agencies struggle to ramp up their operations to meet the enormity of the task, UN officials said here on Thursday.(..)WFP Executive Director Josette Sheeran began a two-day visit to Haiti on Thursday to assess the situation, visit those affected and meet with government and relief agency officials.


21 January 2010

Arriving in Haiti and walking straight into a landscape of destroyed buildings and devastated lives, Dane Novarlic and his colleagues were left in no doubt as to the scale of the job in hand. As members of the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) Fast IT and Telecommunications Emergency and Support Team (Fittest) based in Dubai, they are well versed with being dropped into such situations and expected to hit the ground running.


21 January 2010

The United Nations' World Food Program estimates three million earthquake survivors in Haiti will need ready-to-eat food rations over the next month. When aid workers face the challenge of providing food in hot, humid climate without refrigeration, they often turn to high-energy biscuits. (..) "These are great because there's no water, there's no electricity, they're not able to cook for themselves," the WFP's Julie Marshall said in Toronto. "This is ideal for an initial response."


21 January 2010

Despite a huge increase in the flow of aid—daily flights at Port-au-Prince's one-runway airport have surged from 30 to 180—the amount of relief supplies remains inadequate to the need. The World Food Program, for example, said more than a quarter-million ready-to-eat food rations had been distributed in Haiti by Tuesday, but that was enough for only a fraction of the three million people thought to be in desperate need. The WFP said it needs to deliver 100 million ready-to-eat rations in the next 30 days, but it only had 16 million meals in the pipeline.


21 January 2010

The UN World Food Programme says it has provided 200,000 people with rations for seven days, but the UN says three million to 3.5 million people have been affected by the quake and it hopes to increase the number of people receiving food to one million this week and at least two million in the following two weeks.


21 January 2010

The Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Program, Josette Sheeran, will travel to Port-au-Prince on Thursday to assess the situation. (..) Justte Sheeran, WFP Executive Director, said, "Well, I am headed into Haiti to look at the logistics of this operation myself, these are the among most complex logistics we have ever seen in a humanitarian operation. In addition to the entire city being destroyed we have warehouses that have collapsed, we have roads closed, we have runways broken, we have ports damaged."


21 January 2010

In one of the ramshackle tent cities that have sprouted in open spaces all across Port-au-Prince, Isa Longchamp, a dishevelled and dejected eight-year-old girl, starts to whimper. After losing her mother when the Haitian capital was devastated by the earthquake of January 12th, she is now struggling to survive. Batted aside when hundreds of desperate victims of the disaster swarmed around aid workers handing out a batch of supplies earlier in the day, she is still hungry.(..)Officials at the World Food Programme said that a week after the earthquake, 200,000 people had received ration packs of high-nutrition biscuits.