Publications
Food for Assets
21 May 2014

The report synthesizes the main findings from evaluations in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Nepal, Senegal and Uganda that assessed the impact of WFP's food for assets activities and identified lessons on how to improve FFA for livelihood resilience.  The evaluations found that WFP provided important food and employment to people in underserved communities during periods of conflict and natural disaster and built useful assets in the process.  Overall impacts were seen in many areas related to resilience including livelihoods, income-generating opportunities, land productivity and social cohesion.  Improvements in longer term food security were limited. Impacts on women were significant.  The report recommends that food for assets activities be brought into line with current policy and guidance; adequate funding be secured corporately at least for the transition; strategic planning in country offices position food for assets as a resilience and disaster risk reduction measure; WFP strengthen its efforts to provide guidance and support to regional bureau and country offices; two studies be undertaken on food security and gender dynamics; and monitoring systems be revised for better outcome monitoring. 

Livelihoods, Food for Assets
1 July 2013

This evaluation was one in a series that assessed the outcomes and impacts of WFP's food-for-assets programming on livelihoods resilience. The evaluation emphasized learning by identifying lessons for enhancing the impacts on resilience and aligning food-for-assets programming with WFP's recently adopted 2011 Food for Assets Guidance Manual and Disaster Risk Reduction Policy. The evaluation covered the food/cash for assets component of WFP Nepal Country Programme (2002 - 2007) and the Protracted Relief and Recovery Programme (2007 - 2010). Approximately 107,710 laborers annually received 40 - 70 days of rations in the lean season. The evaluation used a mixed method approach that included reanalysis of an existing household survey, plus new data from asset assessments, focus groups, and interviews.

The evaluation found that WFP Nepal made an important contribution to immediate food security of several million food insecure people. This was especially important during the extended conflict and post conflict period, compounded by drought, food price inflation and other forces. Public assets made a significant contribution to economic and social capital during and after conflict, although benefits were not always equitably distributed. In Nepal's context of severe caste, ethnic, gender and geographic inequality, care should be taken to design assets and associated processes to meet the needs of the poorest. To achieve long term sustained impact, WFP should develop longer term projects that include all the necessary associated elements of partnership, participatory planning, social mobilization, maintenance arrangements, and adequate technical planning and support for asset design and construction. The evaluation made seven reommendations related to these issues.

Food for Assets, School Meals
16 November 2012

The World Food Programme works with governments across Asia to design and manage large-scale, innovative programmes, focused on those who need them most. These programmes are often called ‘safety nets’ – projects designed to protect the most vulnerable at critical times, and so allow them to make the most of each new opportunity to improve their lives.

Food for Assets, Gender, Nutrition, School Meals
21 December 2011
This strategic evaluation analysed the role of WFP in ending long-term hunger. Three activities were identified to contribute to that goal: MCHN,SF and FFW/A.  
 
Based on overall evaluation findings, the team concluded that long-term hunger cannot be tackled in isolation.  This conclusion led to one of the six recommendations; WFP should approach hunger holistically, integrating short-term and long-term hunger solutions.  The other five recommendations are related to each of the five evaluation questions, common to all four strategic evaluations in this series.
Emergencies, Food for Assets, General Food Distribution, Nutrition, School Meals
20 May 2011

 The Annual Evaluation Report for 2010 focuses on operational issues arising from evaluations of country portfolios and operations, and impact evaluations of selected school feeding programmes.

The findings reaffirm WFP’s corporate areas of strength in responding to emergencies under the most difficult circumstances and in providing school feeding, as one of the Programme’s flagship programmes. However, impact evaluations of these programmes also showed the importance of implementing school feeding in cooperation with partners who invest in education sector improvements. Areas where largest improvements can be made relate to food-for-work, where funding often is curtailed and thus strategic objectives moved beyond reach, and nutrition where the ambiguous objectives and small size of programmes make it difficult to demonstrate results.

Food for Assets, Gender, Nutrition, School Meals
15 December 2010

This strategic evaluation analysed the role of WFP in ending long-term hunger. Three activities were identified to contribute to that goal: MCHN,SF and FFW/A.  

Based on overall evaluation findings, the team concluded that long-term hunger cannot be tackled in isolation.  This conclusion led to one of the six recommendations; WFP should approach hunger holistically, integrating short-term and long-term hunger solutions.  The other five recommendations are related to each of the five evaluation questions, common to all four strategic evaluations in this series.

Crop and Food Assessments, Emergency Assessments, Livelihoods, Monitoring, Droughts, Emergencies, Refugees and IDPs, Floods, Food for Assets, Food Security Analysis, General Food Distribution, NGOs, Nutrition, School Meals
25 October 2010

From 2002 to 2009, WFP has assisted Nepal  with a portfolio comprising 15 operations worth US$282 million with the aims to save lives, invest in disaster preparedness, protect and rebuild livelihoods, reduce malnutrition, improve educational outcomes and develop government capacities. 

 
This report evaluates the portfolio against three questions: i) How well did WFP position itself strategically and align with government and partner strategies? ii) How did WFP make choices and how strategic were these? and, iii) How did the portfolio perform, and what were its results?
 
The evaluation found that WFP’s portfolio was closely aligned with the Government of Nepal’s and people’s needs and that WFP made good strategic choices.  Food assistance was efficiently and effectively delivered resulting in positive outcomes for food for work/assets/training, nutrition and education interventions and general food distributions. Engaging in longer-term productive safety nets, developing an integrated lifecycle approach to nutrition, maintaining emergency response capacity, enhancing WFP’s role in policy dialogue and refining ongoing operations are recommended for the future.
 
Crop and Food Assessments, Livelihoods, Monitoring, Droughts, Emergencies, Refugees and IDPs, Floods, Food for Assets, Food Security Analysis, NGOs, Nutrition, School Meals
4 October 2010

From 2002 to 2009, WFP has assisted Nepal  with a portfolio comprising 15 operations worth US$282 million with the aims to save lives, invest in disaster preparedness, protect and rebuild livelihoods, reduce malnutrition, improve educational outcomes and develop government capacities. 

This report evaluates the portfolio against three questions: i) How well did WFP position itself strategically and align with government and partner strategies? ii) How did WFP make choices and how strategic were these? and, iii) How did the portfolio perform, and what were its results?
The evaluation found that WFP’s portfolio was closely aligned with the Government of Nepal’s and people’s needs and that WFP made good strategic choices.  Food assistance was efficiently and effectively delivered resulting in positive outcomes for food for work/assets/training, nutrition and education interventions and general food distributions. Engaging in longer-term productive safety nets, developing an integrated lifecycle approach to nutrition, maintaining emergency response capacity, enhancing WFP’s role in policy dialogue and refining ongoing operations are recommended for the future.