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25 June 2013

Hunger in Pakistan is at emergency levels after years of conflict and floods, but funding has dwindled as new crises such as Syria grab donors' attention, the United Nations food aid chief said on Sunday. (..) Although most have now returned, about half of Pakistan's population still does not have secure access to enough food, up from a little over a third a decade ago, the U.N. World Food Programme (WFP) said. Fifteen percent of children are severely malnourished, and some 40 percent suffer from stunted growth. "This is an emergency situation, both from the food security side as well as from the malnutrition side," WFP chief Ertharin Cousin told Reuters. "We need to raise the alarm." (..) Already, Cousin said, the rising cost of the refugee crisis in Syria meant it was harder to attract funds to Pakistan.


7 January 2013

Double-digit inflation pushes price of basic staples beyond the reach of many families amid widespread poverty. (..) The UN says more than half its population barely have enough to eat, and an energy shortage is making things worse.


22 November 2012

Despite efforts by the Pakistani government and international organizations, inflation, declining income, natural disasters and stagnating domestic productivity are hampering attempts to achieve food security for the country’s 180 million citizens. (..) “Over the last couple of years, Pakistan has officially been a food surplus country in terms of cereal production,” says Krishna Pahari, head of WFP’s Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping unit in Islamabad. “But many households here don’t have access to that food. Many are marginal, deficit, subsistence farmers whose own production is not enough to meet their needs.”


10 August 2012

Bajaur, one of the seven administrative units in Pakistan's federally administered tribal area (Fata), on the border with Afghanistan, has experienced a marked rise in school enrolment since the beginning of the year. (..) For many the incentive is the ration of four litres of cooking oil (worth around £3, or just under $5) distributed every second month by the World Food Programme's (WFP) Back to School, Stay in School programme. (..) WFP spokesman Amjad Jamal says the programme has a two-pronged strategy: to address short-term hunger and nutritional deficiencies, and increase enrolment and retain those already in school.


9 July 2012

The coastal district, some 209 km southeast of Karachi and on the eastern side of the Indus River, normally sees irrigation water flowing by March 15 for the cultivation of summer season crops including rice, cotton, sugarcane, banana, maize and onion. But this year, unusually cold temperatures in the mountains mean glacier melt has been slow and there is little water. It’s the kind of problem scientists say will become more frequent as climate change brings more extreme weather and as it alters glacier melt and rainfall patterns, bringing both worsening flooding and droughts.


9 July 2012

The coastal district, some 209 km southeast of Karachi and on the eastern side of the Indus River, normally sees irrigation water flowing by March15 for the cultivation of summer season crops including rice, cotton, sugarcane, banana, maize and onion. But this year, unusually cold temperatures in the mountains mean glacier melt has been slow and there is little water. It’s the kind of problem scientists say will become more frequent as climate change brings more extreme weather and as it alters glacier melt and rainfall patterns, bringing both worsening flooding and droughts.


1 June 2012

Students have been provided energy biscuits and cooking oil under the World Food Program-sponsored programme since 2009. Teachers said that the project is achieving more than their expectations. “Apart from increasing enrolment in primary schools, the programme aims to eliminate child labour and improve attendance,” Programme Manager Amjad Ali told The Express Tribune. He said that around 130,000 children and teachers in 610 primary schools of the upper Swat (Pakistan) have benefited from the programme.


5 April 2012

The World Food Program (WFP) is taking practical steps to stabilize and improve the nutritional and food security levels in different areas in Pakistan through ‘Wawa Mum’ and ‘Acha Mum’ products produced in Pakistan. "Wawa Mum" is an instant nutrition for young children and ‘Acha Mum’ is a supplementary food for malnourished children. (..) “We are using these products in the Community based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) program in selected districts of Punjab, Sindh, Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. It helped to treat nearly half a million malnourished children,” Amjad Jamal, spokesperson of WFP Pakistan, told Arab News.


13 March 2012

KARACHI: With food prices twice as high as a decade ago, feeding nearly 600 million people suffering from hunger and malnutrition in the Asia-Pacific region is becoming more difficult, according to the regional representative of the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, which opened a major regional conference in Hanoi, an FAO statement said on Monday.


12 March 2012

The Government of Pakistan is committed to improving its global health index and we are dedicated to ensure that Pakistan’s most vulnerable, especially women and children, get vitamins and minerals they need to survive and thrive, said Mr. Muhammad Ayub, Senior Chief, Planning and Development Division, Government of Pakistan. (..) Mr. Carl Paulson, Head of Programmes from World Food Programmes in his remarks, assured that the WFP would continue to support the people of Pakistan for elimination of malnutrition in the country.