Hunger in the news
Share

20 September 2013

After more than two decaded of civil war, Somalia’s capital is enjoying a sense of relative calm. But Mogadishu is still struggling to recover from the fighting. Compounding the challenge are tens of thousands of people who have fled south-central Somalia to live in squalid camps in the city. They face insecurity, lack of clean water and sanitation and inadequate food. 


20 September 2013

.

Donors have pledged 1.8bn euros ($2.4bn; £1.5bn) at a conference in Brussels to help Somalia end more than two decades of conflict.

The money is part of a "New Deal" for what is widely regarded as a failed state, officials said

The EU and Somali government believe now is a good time to adopt the programme as the country has entered a new era, with a more legitimate government and progress on the security front.

 

The New Deal focuses on peace and state-building. 


20 September 2013

The number of people in crisis in Somalia is at its lowest since famine was declared in Somalia in 2011, thanks to successive seasons of average to above average rainfall, low food prices and sustained humanitarian response but acute malnutrition continues to pose a threat to hundreds of thousands of children especially in the country’s south, latest findings indicate.

A joint report by the Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit for Somalia (FSNAU), a project managed by UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) indicates an estimated 870,000 people will be in Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phase 3 and Phase 4) from August to December 2013. The situation has significantly improved since 2011 when 4 million Somalis were in extreme food security crisis. The recent figures also represent a continued improvement since January when an estimated 1,050,000 people were in Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phases 3 and 4). Improvements are attributed to a near average July/August 2013 Gu harvest, increased livestock prices, increased livestock herd sizes, improved milk availability, low prices of both local and imported staple food commodities, higher purchasing power from income from labor and livestock sales, and sustained humanitarian interventions over the last six months.

However, nearly 2.3 million additional people beyond those requiring more urgent assistance, one-third of Somalia’s population, are classified as Stressed (IPC Phase 2); their food security remains fragile. This group of households may struggle to meet their own minimal food requirement through the end of the year, and they remain highly vulnerable to major shocks that could push them back to food security crisis.


20 September 2013

With a federal government shakily holding on to power in Mogadishu and violence significantly reduced, Somalia and the EU co-host a conference of international donors in Brussels today, intended to chart a new course to peace and prosperity.

But on 30 September, those hopeful prospects will be thrown into jeopardy when Barclays closes the accounts of 250 Somali money transfer services, including Dahabshiil, which is much the biggest of the lot.
 

Barclays initially announced, in a letter to Dahabshiil and others dated 8 May, that the accounts would be closed on 30 July. It wrote: “Acceptance and eligibility criteria have been amended for customers in this sector,  which unfortunately means we will no longer be able to provide banking services to businesses that fall outside of these.”

 

For the international aid community, the severing of the remittance pipeline threatens to spark a new Somali emergency. And the effect on the agencies is even more direct than that, because in the absence of banks, they depend on the MTOs to funnel aid money to their Somali projects. The vast majority of them, including Oxfam, Care International and World Vision, use Dahabshiil, as does the United Nations.


11 February 2013

The World Food Program (WFP) reports it plans to feed 1.6 million people in Somalia this year, including more than one million people who are in a state of crisis. (..) Though the number of those in need has dropped by more than half, WFP says the situation remains critical, especially in the south. It is for this reason that WFP says it is particularly happy to be able to work again in the port city of Kismayo. (..) WFP spokeswoman Elizabeth Byrs said a rapid food security and nutrition assessment carried out in Kismayo shows the severity of the situation there.


4 February 2013

The top United Nations relief official in Somalia today announced that the number of people in crisis in the Horn of Africa country was halved in the past six months, but cautioned that the situation remains fragile and that the gains could reverse without continued support to meet people's basic needs. "Our innovative approaches to aid delivery, coupled with relatively favourable rains, has made a profound difference in the lives of people," acting UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia Stefano Porretti said today in a statement, citing recent data on food security from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Famine Early Warning Systems Network. However Mr. Porretti, who is also the WFP Representative in Somalia, noted that "this is not the time to be complacent.”


30 January 2013

More than four years after conflict and pervasive insecurity forced it to shutter its operations in southern Somalia, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has resumed food assistance to the region’s port city of Kismayo, the agency announced today. With relative peace returning to the Horn of Africa nation, WFP managed to conduct an assessment of food security in Kismayo last November only to discover high levels of malnutrition and food insecurity throughout the city.


25 January 2013

For more than a year, following a spate of kidnappings of aid workers, outside journalists have not been able to visit this isolated, arid camp.(..) The World Food Programme relies on donor funds to feed the almost half a million people in Dadaab. But they are almost $40 million short on keeping people fed for the next six months and are contemplating ration cuts in a camp where people currently exist on the bare minimum. Australia has donated two million dollars but it is a drop in the bucket for what is actually needed.


12 December 2012

The U.N. says millions of people in Somalia still require humanitarian aid, despite advances against al-Shabab militants. A new funding appeal has been launched to address the country’s immediate needs and build resilience against future shocks, such as droughts, floods or further conflict. (..) A three year strategy has been launched called the Somalia Consolidated Appeal Plan. It asks for $1.3 billion for the first year.