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17 June 2013

Prime Minister Mohammed Salem Basindwa met here on Saturday with the newly appointed representative of the World Food Programme (WFP) in Yemen Bishaw Parajuli. During the meeting, Basindwa and Parajuli discussed aspects of the current and future cooperation between Yemen and the WFP to encounter food shortage, especially in the food-poorest areas in a number of governorates targeted by the government and the WFP. The WFP official briefed the Prime Minister on joint programs scheduled to be implemented in the remaining period of the current year in coordination with the Education Ministry.


7 March 2013

The difficulty is that Yemen faces a humanitarian crisis of a magnitude that could render political progress redundant. Figures compiled by the World Food Programme suggest almost half of Yemen's population of 25 million has fallen into debt as a result of buying food on credit


1 October 2012

Nearly half of Yemenis go to bed hungry every night as political instability compounds a global food and fuel price surge, giving the Arabian Peninsula state the world's third-highest rate of child malnutrition, the World Food Programme said on Sunday. (..) "Five million people, or 22 percent of the population, can't feed themselves or buy enough to feed themselves ... These are mostly landless laborers, so they don't grow their own food, and with high food prices they can't buy it either," said WFP spokesman Barry Came.


24 September 2012

Faced with an intensifying humanitarian crisis, which has left a quarter of women between the ages of 15 and 49 acutely malnourished, they say they’re struggling to feed their families and are unable to participate in the country’s transition. (..) The United Nations’ World Food Program says 10 million Yemenis, nearly half the population, do not have enough food to eat. The crisis is blamed on a number of factors, including soaring food and fuel prices in the past year.


24 September 2012

SANAA, Yemen — Women in Yemen are worse off now than a year ago, when they played a significant part in the country’s revolution that promised political and economic change, an international aid agency has concluded.


30 July 2012

Yemen is struggling with multiple crises: If an ongoing uprising and endless clashes between Yemen’s security forces and al-Qaida militants weren’t enough of a challenge for the impoverished nation, nearly half of Yemen’s people are going hungry, with many facing the danger of starvation. (..) Children are particularly vulnerable. The WFP reports that half of Yemen's children are chronically malnourished and that one out of ten does not live to reach the age of five.


16 July 2012

Yemen imports up to 90 per cent of its main staple foods, including wheat and sugar, which many households struggle to purchase. (..) Conflict and political instability have also played a factor, greatly increasing the number of internally displaced people (IDP) who are now dependent on food aid. (..) According to the World Food Programme (WFP), 670,000 IDPs rely on food aid in the south and north of the country.


12 July 2012

“The latest figures for Yemen are not far from the situation in Sahel in Africa or Afghanistan, but unfortunately this is not attracting attention from the world,” said Jamal Benomar, the United Nations envoy to Yemen. Hunger in Yemen — the poorest country in the Middle East — has doubled since 2009, according to the World Food Program. The ability of families to feed their children has deteriorated significantly in the last year as food and fuel prices have soared amid the political turmoil.


14 June 2012

The UN's food agency said Wednesday that this year's forecasts for global food production are positive overall but warned that some areas will likely struggle due to armed conflict and displacement. (..) Despite the positive trend, "several regions of the world are expected to struggle with the consequences of poor rainfall, severe weather, armed conflict and displacement," the Rome-based agency said.


12 June 2012

In the sweltering port city of Aden, about 300km south of Yemen’s capital Sana’a, two dozen international NGOs are struggling to meet mounting humanitarian demands caused by a war raging in neighbouring Abyan Governorate where government troops have for a month fought to crush a local Al Qaeda ally, Ansar Al Shariah. Few aid workers have been granted access to the governorate and those in Aden face growing security constraints due to organized criminal groups.