WFP's HIV And TB Policy


Comprehensive, sustainable HIV food and nutrition support must take into account the needs of people living with HIV and those living with TB, as well as people affected by these diseases. Effective support leverages the strengths of the health sector and of local communities. Consequently, WFP pursues a two-tier approach to this type of food and nutrition support, focusing on:

  • Curative support to the infected (usually part of ‘treatment’): Activities include nutritional assessments, education and counselling as well as provision of specialized, highly nutritious food products for nutritional recovery. Support is usually provided through the health sector on the basis of clear eligibility criteria.
  • Enabling/preventive support to the affected (a part of ‘care and support’): Activities include income transfers to households in the form of food, vouchers or cash. These transfers are usually provided through communities and are closely linked to curative support.

 

   

Intervention

Beneficiaries

Duration

Treatment, care and support

(Curative)

 
  • Nutrition assessment, education and counselling (NAEC) incl. infant feeding
  • Specialized food products for nutritional rehabilitation
  • NAEC for all infected
  • All malnourished on treatment
  • NAEC throughout treatment (TB)/life (HIV)
  • Food until nutritional recovery, usually 6 months
Mitigation and safety nets

(Enabling /
preventative)

 
  • Finite income transfer in the form of food, vouchers or cash
  • Finite income transfer in the form of food, vouchers or cash for households hosting orphans and vulnerable children
  • Peer support & community-based support to guarantee a continuum of care
  • HIV/TB-sensitive safety nets
  • Affected households
  • Affected households hosting orphans and vulnerable children
  • Peers and community
  • All
  • For duration of support to infected (curative)
  • Based on need, may be longer-term
  • Based on need, may be longer-term
  • Longer-term

 

Food and nutrition support for people living with HIV and/or TB cannot stand in isolation, but rather must be part of a broader response to the diseases, including livelihood and social protection interventions, to ensure long-term treatment and intervention success.