Our Work

Logistics


Desert, swamp or jungle, to get food to the hungry, WFP's logistics team has to negotiate some of the toughest terrain on the planet.

On average, WFP reaches more than 80 million people with food assistance in 75 countries each year.

When the areas needing food are not accessible by road, rail or river, other methods are brought into play. An emergency may require a cargo drop from aircraft or a helicopter airlift, but there are other options too. Locally engaged porters, as well as teams of elephants, yak, donkeys and camels are also used when necessary. 

Always on the move

On any given day WFP operates an average of:

  • 70 aircraft
  • 20 ships
  • 5,000 trucks

The different ways WFP transports food can be grouped into three categories: surface transport, shipping and aviation

Rapid response

About half the food distributed by WFP is sourced directly within the country or region where it is needed. The other half, sourced internationally, is shipped by sea and unloaded in more than 70 ports around the world.

Thanks to a range of strategies, WFP is always able to provide a rapid response to hunger emergencies. A key element in this response is the WFP-managed network of UN Humanitarian Response Depots. These are hubs, positioned near disaster-prone areas around the world, where emergency supplies are stored in readiness.

Serving the humanitarian community

WFP's expertise in logistics meant that in 2005 the agency was mandated to lead logistics operations whenever a humanitarian emergency requires a joint response from UN agencies and the humanitarian community. The group of agencies or organisations which work together is called the Logistics Cluster.

WFP also provides passenger air transport to the entire humanitarian community through the UN Humanitarian Air Service (see video on right), which goes to more than 250 locations worldwide.

Key Logistics Documents

Logistics Latest

  • Bridging the Gap in Malawi

    With funding from Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency and in partnership with the Swedish Civil Contingency Agency (MSB) and Malawi’s Ministry of Transport and Public Works, WFP is constructing three bailey bridges in Malawi – the first of which has just opened on the Msuwazi river

  • UNHAS Expands Yemen Service

    UNHAS Expands Yemen Service

    Not all airlines would marvel at the idea of landing a plane in Yemen’s war-torn capital Sana’a, let alone to repeat the feat not once, but regularly over a sustained period. But, the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service often operates flights to places commercial carriers would never go. In 2015, as major airlines pulled out of Yemen citing growing unrest, UNHAS Yemen was just being activated. Almost one year later and several flights down the line, the service has extended its activities in order to better respond to needs.

  • Russia’s Kamaz Trucks Donated To Support WFP Operations In DRC

    The Government of the Russian Federation has donated 30 KAMAZ trucks to the World Food Programme of the United Nations (WFP) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to facilitate food deliveries and distributions to vulnerable people and the provision of services to humanitarian partners in hard-to-reach and crisis-hit areas.