Logistics Blog

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WFP logistics - We deliver

 

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We Deliver to Save Lives

Logistics is at the core of WFP operations. Each year, WFP distributes over five million metric tonnes of food and relief cargo, facing the challenge of reaching an average of 100 million beneficiaries across some of the toughest terrain on the planet.  Here's how:

Loggie of the Year

The yearly WFP Staff Awards of Merit ceremony was held recently.   Among the awards, one is dedicated to logistics: the Tun Myat Award for Excellence in Humanitarian Logistics. This year, Matthew Dee, the WFP Deputy Head of Logistics in Somalia, was chosen.

Nepal's Super Highway

In today’s fast paced world of technological evolution, it is easy to think that delivering food has become easier.  However, in the extreme mountain terrain of Nepal, technology has had no place, at least not until now.  Delivering food using yaks and mules along impervious trails and paths through the mountains has been common practice for WFP Logistics, sometimes taking cargo up to three weeks to reach the most remote locations.  

UNHRD - Accra is Up and Running

In 2006, WFP Logistics embarked on the United Nations Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD) network project with the aim of replicating globally the Brindisi rapid response base. The UNHRD Network initiative supports WFP in meeting its corporate goal of being prepared to respond to four large scale emergencies at any given time as well as augmenting the emergency response efforts of UN, International, Governmental and Non-Governmental Organisations.

OOPS! We did it again!!!

 Many organisations share the need to make knowledge available where Internet connectivity is a challenge.  So what's the solution? OOPS!

Championing Aviation Safety

The second annual LOG.LEO Awards ceremony took place on 31 March at the Kempinski Hotel Mall of the Emirates in Dubai.  Each year, the LOG LEO awards are given to people who are in the logistics/transport business.  This year, one of WFP's own took home one of the awards.

The Longest Road - Part III of III

Part I and Part II

It was in early 2005, with the support of global shipping giant TNT and the Moving The World Programme, Robin's team was quickly able to get people on the ground and enter the final phase of the process. It is not always easy to establish a new program in a country but luckily they had buy in from the Malawian Ministry of Health and the help of a skilled individual who had experience working in Malawi. Seconded to them was logistics specialist, Alastair Cook, who had previously helped establish a school feeding project for WFP. Upon his arrival he wasted no time putting the pieces together to get the project rolling.

The Longest Road - Part II of III

Robin Landis was first introduced to Paul's activities while working as a consultant to the United Nation's World Food Programme. Working off a call to action from Secretary General Kofi Anan to all UN agencies to step up a concerted effort to curb the AIDS epidemic, Robin was heavily engaged in determining how best to tackle the problem as it pertained to WFP beneficiaries and staff members. It became clear to Robin that WFP’s response had to not only address HIV programmatically and in the workplace but also find a way to prevent HIV from taking its toll on the contract drivers who  “were falling through the cracks”.

The Longest Road - Part I of III

The longest road in Africa runs from north to south, east to west and cuts through the hearts and lives of truckers and sex workers across the continent. It is a trail of tears and a trail of hope. The truck stops that were once hotbeds of AIDS/HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have now become centers for healing thanks to the efforts of a small team of individuals that have worked tirelessly to stop the transmission of HIV in Africa. This is the story of that small team and lives of those they have impacted.

The Logistics Operational Guide (LOG)

The Logistics Cluster, for which WFP is the lead agency, recently worked with a wide range of partner organisations to launch a new tool for the benefit of the humanitarian logistics community. The Logistics Operational Guide, referred to as the LOG is a consolidation of humanitarian logistics information covering a wide range of logistics activities, definitions, practical application of logistics concepts, right through to information on how to facilitate an exit of staff and equipment from an operation. Though still a work in progress, the LOG offers up a wealth of information.