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WFP's UNHAS Transports Emergency Telecoms Team To The Remote Mountains Of Ile De La Gonave, Haiti

I arrived at the air base at 0730 for an 0830 departure on board a Bell 212 helicopter operated by Evergreen Aviation and chartered by the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS). I was traveling with one of WFP's emergency ICT teams, also known as a Fast IT and Emergency Telecommunications and Support (FITTEST) team, who were on their way to install a repeater at the top of a mountain on the Ile de la Gonave. The island is sparsely populated and lies approximately 75kms West-North-West of Port-au-Prince.

The Clinton Foundation Trucks

They are big and yellow and covered with Penske stickers. The 20 International Durastar 4300 series trucks donated by the Clinton Foundation rest between runs in a massive warehouse complex not far from where I sit in Log Base. However, they stay idle only for a few minutes before they are tasked again and loaded with tents, latrines, rice and beans.

WFP Shipping Brings Life To Haiti's Once Devastated Port-Au-Prince Port

WFP Shipping has worked tirelessly to help bring Haiti's ports back online. Port-au-Prince port, where 90% of all seaborne container traffic arrives in Haiti, is once again running smoothly thanks to the efforts of the team. WFP has now also successfully docked the first passenger vessels in 35 years at the port's South Pier. The Sea Voyager and Ola Esmeralda, both WFP chartered vessels, arrived yesterday at the south pier.

The Logistics Of Getting To Work

I live on a ship. It is a big ship. There are beds, staircases, a dining room and even a bit of levity in the few waking moments we are onboard.

We wake up at 5:30am every morning. After a quick breakfast we strap on our life vests and head for the door. We walk down the gang plank, grab on to the rails and lower ourselves into a waiting lifeboat.

The life vests tend to restrict the amount you can turn your head so conversation is kept to a minimum. As we motor away toward the shore we perspire, some sleep and catch glimpses of the fishermen in their small wooden canoes.

WFP Rice Discharge Underway In Cap Haitien, Haiti

On March 4th, the barge Connor with the tug Miss Cloe, both US flag, arrived in Cap Haitien in the northern most part of Haiti. Loaded with 6,993 metric tonnes of rice, the vessel began unloading a few days later after a rain delay.

For the duration of the discharge, WFP Port Captain Piotr Drozdowski has supervised the process. He has been sending us regular updates and keeping us informed of the progress.

A standard dispatch from the field reads as follows:

WFP And British Military Deliver Food To The Remote Haitian Town Of Anse-a-Veau

I wake up every night at about 3am. At least I have been since Monday. I don't think the adrenaline has subsided. I am still thinking about the delivery and how it went after we left.

WFP And British Royal Navy Working To Feed The People Of Haiti

I didn't think we would go today. Someone told me last night that the forecast was for rain. As the sun rose this morning there was the usual mist and clouds hovering on the peaks that stand above Port-au-Prince but no sign of rain.

Our Teams on the Ground

Every month WFP Logistics puts together an internal Bulletin  to inform and involve Logistics staff of activities carried out across the world. 

The Men Of The Logistics Emergency Teams (LET)

The cargo area at Las Americas Airport in Santo Domingo is hot at midday. The ocean breeze coming from the nearby coast drifts lazily over the warrens of warehousing units and affords little relief from the Caribbean sun which hangs high overhead. The air is choked with dust and exhaust from the multitudes of forklifts, trucks, motorcycles and big rigs that ply the narrow streets.