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Ninety Minutes Over Hispaniola

When you leave the runway in Santo Domingo, the earth falls away - quickly replaced by verdant green jungle cloaking the rolling hills to the west of the city. Tropical haze soon separates you from the ground and you can only make out soft forms passing far below. Off to the east smoke-stacks punctuate the grey cityscape and the gentle curve of the jagged coast cuts to the horizon.

The Santo Domingo Operations Center

I can't remember how long I have been here. I am not sure anyone can. There are no windows and the light is flat and grey. In the aviation office it is even worse - Paolo looks like he is about to collapse. He processes hundreds of request daily for a few dozen open seats and constantly answers calls from aid workers who are both hopped up on adrenaline and sagging under the weight of jet lag.

Latest Photos Of UNHAS Haiti Emergency Air Operations In Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Numerous agencies are currently taking advantage of the humanitarian air bridge which United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) has set up between Aeropuerto Internacional La Isabela in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and Toussaint Louverture Airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Daily UNHAS Shuttle From Santo Domingo To Port-Au-Prince Runs Like A Well Oiled Machine

Jan Steinvik and Jarno Nisula are two of the nicest UNHAS air operations officers you will ever meet.

Photos Of WFP Logistic's UNHAS Evacuating Wounded On First Flight Out Of Port-Au-Prince, Haiti

We just received these photos from our Deputy Chief of Aviation, Philippe Martou, in Port-au-Prince. The images show an injured child being loaded onto WFP's United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) at the main airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Latest Photos Of Damaged Port In Port-au-Prince, Haiti

We received these photos a short while ago from our Port Captain, Niels Olsen, who is currently on the ground in Haiti. Niels is working with various officials and agencies on the ground to determine the best course of action for returning the ports to operational status as quickly as possible.

The photos show the devastation at the main port including the collapsed piers, toppled cranes and buckled roads. Even with all destruction Niels sounds hopeful that at least part of the port can be made operable fairly soon.

Photos Of Earthquake Devastation At The Port In The Haitian Capital Of Port-Au-Prince

We just received these photos of the devastation at the port in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince.

These were taken moments after earthquake and show the damage that we have been highlighting in our latest logistics updates on the WFP Logistics Portal.

Please be sure to check the portal for the latest logistics updates from Haiti. You can also follow us on Twitter: @wfplogistics

Response By WFP Logistics To The Earthquake In Haiti

Staff situation

WFP international staff is safe and accounted for, while national staff is still being contacted to confirm their well-being. The WFP office in Port-au-Prince is in good condition, as are WFP sub-offices in Cap Haitian and Gonaives, both of which are operational.

Infrastructure and Logistics Information

What the Eagles have to say about WFP Logistics

I have worked with WFP Logistics for two years from 2006-2008. I was based in HQ, but did a couple of missions, to Mozambique in 2008 and to Myanmar later that same year. Last week I returned to WFP and to Logistics after a year and a half away, doing a Master's degree in Holland. Upon return, my boss, Peter, asked me to write a post on what it was like to come back, what remained the same and what had changed. This is that post.

The FIAT N3 Is The Workhorse Of WFP's Operations In The Somali Region Of Ethiopia

The Somali region of Ethiopia is not an easy place to work. Clan disputes, banditry, searing heat and endless miles of harsh terrain make it one of WFP's most challenging missions. Food distribution in the region would be all but impossible were it not for a fleet of ailing, decades old trucks that are a key part of WFP Ethiopia's operations.