Hunger in the news

A daily selection of news reports from the world's media dealing with hunger and responses to it.
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Hunger in the news
4 March 2009

Ethiopia: Urgent food supplies stuck in Djibouti

Beneficiaries of food aid in Ethiopia could face tougher times unless supplies that are stuck in Djibouti port arrive quickly in the country, sources said. Officials blamed congestion at Djibouti port, land-locked Ethiopia's main access to the sea, but insisted the situation was improving. [...] "A large quantity of WFP's [UN World Food Programme] food is at the port," Paulette Jones, WFP spokeswoman in Addis Ababa, said. "These [food] commodities are needed urgently to assist beneficiaries who are still suffering from the impact of the drought, high food prices and [low] global food stocks."
IRIN News
Hunger in the news
4 March 2009

Aid in the downturn - In need of more

Among the raft of big proposals on domestic spending in Barack Obama’s maiden budget was a subtle indication of a shift in America’s priorities—a promise to double the country’s aid budget, eventually. [...] This is welcome news at an uncertain times for foreign-aid flows. But without similar moves by other rich countries, an increase in American aid will not be enough to offset the effects of the financial crisis and economic slump. The need for aid is increasing as the downturn worsens the already parlous condition of the poor across the developing world. [...] Trade, which created jobs for the low-skilled in developing countries, is collapsing at a rapid rate: 2009 is likely to see the first decline in trade flows since a small dip in 1982. And farmers in poor countries are facing the effects of a dramatic crash in food prices.
The Economist
Hunger in the news
4 March 2009

Ghana: Nutritionist Worried Over High Cases of Malaria

THE DEPUTY Chief Nutrition Officer and Programme Manager of the Nutrition Malaria Control for Child Survival Project (NMCCSP) at the Nutrition Department of the Ghana Health Service, Headquarters, Accra, Madam Hannah Adjei, has expressed concern over the high incidence of malaria among children. Speaking at a forum in Bolgatanga, the nutritionist said malaria remained the single largest killer of children, accounting for about 26% of deaths, and 40% of out-patient and hospital admission cases. [...] The Upper East Regional Acting Nutrition Officer, Madam Fati Wasai-Bobtoya, identified disease, poverty and hunger, as the major causes of severe malaria and malnutrition among children. She said when children were malnourished, it took a very long time for them to recover, and that there was the need for all and sundry to play pivotal roles to deal with the situation. Madam Wasai-Bobtoya thanked the World Food Programme for its emergency food supply towards improving the nutrition status of malnourished children at the various rehabilitation centres across the region.
All Africa / The Chronicle (Ghana)
Hunger in the news
4 March 2009

IMF lists 26 'highly vulnerable' countries

The International Monetary Fund has warned that the global financial crisis had shifted to the world's poorest nations and 22 countries may need as much as $25 billion in additional funding in 2009 to cope with the economic downturn. The IMF said, based on its projections, the 22 countries could need up to $140 billion if global conditions were to deteriorate sharply. "I foresee mounting problems for developing countries," IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn said, calling it the "third wave" of the crisis, which has spread from financial and credit markets into the consumer economy. He said he expected more countries to turn to the fund for financing and those with IMF aid packages to increase their borrowing. [...] Developing countries have been affected by falling demand for exports and a dramatic slowing in remittances from overseas workers as the economies of the United States and Europe have contracted. A sharp drop in foreign direct investment is expected in about half of all low-income countries. Strauss-Kahn said the decline in food and fuel prices should provide some relief to countries as inflation declines
Irish Times / Reuters
Hunger in the news
4 March 2009

Rising Temperatures Threatening Livelihoods

The ice caps on the Rwenzori Mountains along Uganda's western border have receded significantly in the past century and could disappear completely in the next few years, experts said. [...] South-western Uganda, where temperatures have risen by 0.3 degrees in a decade, is one of the hardest-hit areas in terms of disease outbreaks, especially malaria," Gwage said. A two-degree rise in temperature, he added, would see many areas in Uganda losing their main livelihood of cash crops, including coffee. Other crops such as cassava and soya would be affected by new pests, despite being staple crops. [...] Karamoja, in north-eastern Uganda, experiences cycles of natural disasters and inter-communal conflicts mainly over pasture, water and livestock. It has received very limited investment. In February, the UN World Food Programme noted it was on the brink of a humanitarian catastrophe, after drought cut agricultural output to as low as 30 percent in some areas in 2008
All Africa / IRIN
Hunger in the news
4 March 2009

Uganda: Karamuzi Beat the Challenges of Widowhood to Become Model Farmer

The accident that claimed her husband in 1997 left her a changed woman. With five children to take care of single-handed, Perry Karamuzi realised she had to put aside self-pity and move on. [...] Karamuzi had a number of Friesian cows but she sold them for school fees and remained with one which she zero-grazes. She gets 15 litres of milk from her heifer. "The benefits in zero-grazing are many," she says. "A farmer who practises zero-grazing will never lack manure for their crops." She also has 10 local breed goats. At Karamuzi's home there is no wastage; she puts everything to use. [...] Because of her hard work, in 1994 the district nominated her as a model farmer and she was chosen to host the World Food Programme celebrations.
All Africa / New Vision
Focus on Women
3 March 2009

What Do African Women Eat?

Mathilde Savy and her teams have investigated this question in Burkina Faso for 3 years. In rural areas, they found that women's diet was very monotonous, based on cereals, vegetables and condiments. Meat, fish and fruits were rare and reserved for men.
Liberation
3 March 2009

Hungry for Change

According to the United Nations’ World Food Programme, “Every five seconds, a child dies of hunger.” [...] But how exactly can we eradicate extreme poverty and hunger? San Diegan Jamie Pullman, a “social entrepreneur” living in Little Italy, may just have found an answer. Pullman is the mind behind Hungry for Change, a project aimed at helping to end global poverty. Pullman explains that through Hungry for Change, spare change from every participant’s bank card purchase automatically provides a school-based meal for a hungry child in the developing world, thus making giving automatic, effortless, and sustainable.
San Diego Magazine
Hunger in the news
3 March 2009

WFP portrays bleak picture of food security

The World Food Programme (WFP) has projected a gloomy outlook of [Nepal's]winter crop production this time owing to lack of sufficient rainfall. The winter harvest this time is expected to be poor. The outlook for the winter crop production is worrisome making the people more vulnerable to food insecurity, stated a rapid survey by the WFP. Other factors, according to the survey, affecting food security include remoteness, high food prices and limited income opportunities, posing a high risk of increased food insecurity beginning in April. Food insecurity will become particularly critical from June onwards as Nepal moves into its traditional lean season.
Nepal News
Hunger in the news
3 March 2009

Unreliable information worsens food crises

There is a need to integrate and harmonize information on food security matters as a requisite to contain escalating world food crises in Africa and Latin America, participants in a National Policy Dialogue on Managing and Preventing World Food Crisis have said. The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Programme Leader, Dr Suresh Babu, told participants in Dar es Salaam today that recent studies in developing countries and Latin America had indicated policy makers and leaders lack sufficient information to gauge the likely effects of global food crises in their countries. [...] A coordinator, Tanzania/Japan Food Aid Counterpart Fund which is under the Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Co-operatives, Dr Wilbald Lorri, said countries like Tanzania need to have a well coordinated and harmonized mechanism on food security matters. He said that all key stakeholders such as National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), Tanzania Bureau of Statistics (TBS) and International agencies such as FAO and World food Programme (WFP), should ensure the information gathered in the field is relevant, reliable, consistent and useful.
The Zimbabwean / Daily News (Tanzania)

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