Hunger in the news

A daily selection of news reports from the world's media dealing with hunger and responses to it.
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Hunger in the news
27 February 2009

Cashew and Cocoa: Reducing Hunger and Poverty

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a campaign to support small-scale cashew and cocoa farming in sub-Saharan Africa to alleviate hunger and poverty. The foundation says its main goal is to help more than 350,000 farmers “increase their incomes so they can build better lives for themselves and their families.” [...] Director of agricultural development, Rajiv Shah, says the foundation has similar investment plans in the coffee and dairy sectors of East Africa. He says the foundation is already helping small-scale farmers sell their crops to the World Food Program.
Voice of America News
Hunger in the news
27 February 2009

Free Lunch Tempts Children Into School

The promise of a free meal at lunchtime has over the past few years seen up to 39,000 children going to school in the Republic of Congo, according to the UN World Food Programme (WFP). "Between 2002 and 2009 we've been feeding up to 39,000 children at 1,072 primary schools in the Congo, which has helped them to keep studying," Central Africa regional WFP assistant director Sory Ouane said. "With the help of the Congo [government] we will significantly increase this number in the future."
All Africa / IRIN
Hunger in the news
27 February 2009

Global Financial Crisis Surface In Ghana

Currently, Ghana is an economy that is being held together with bailing wire and glue, strangled in a madman's race to see what kills it first, corporate food and medical nightmares or the ever increasing march to global financial war. [...] The big question now for Africa is how badly it will be bruised by the global financial meltdown. “It's becoming clear that many developing countries — African countries — will not be immune to the spillover effects of this global financial crisis,” says CEO, Gold Coast Securities, Ben Kujar. So, we consider that … particularly poor people within these countries are now in a kind of danger zone. And the danger for them lies in the fact that they're taking a hit from what I call the “Four Fs” — the fuel crisis, food crisis, the fertilizer crisis and now the financial crisis.” Ben Kujar is referring to the massive rise in the price of the three commodities — fuel, food and fertilizer — over the past year or so that has prompted riots in several African countries, including Ghana. He warns that the current global turbulence could certainly have a knock-on effect on the continent
Modern Ghana
For Companies
27 February 2009

Walk the World: The Origins

WFP
Hunger in the news
27 February 2009

Zimbabwe: UN Pledge to Contain Humanitarian Crisis

A United Nations interagency humanitarian mission to Zimbabwe has pledged to ensure that the country's humanitarian crisis is contained. Addressing reporters in Johannesburg on Thursday, UN Assistant Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, Catherine Bragg said the country's humanitarian crisis remained grave. [...] According to the Deputy Regional Representative from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), Timo Pakkala, the programme has spent more than $240 million to support at least seven million vulnerable people as well as curtail food shortage.
All Africa / Bua News
Hunger in the news
26 February 2009

Getting shirty for Rwanda

Warwickshire express delivery giant TNT has put in another ‘Premier League’ performance after being called on by a prospective parliamentary candidate to deliver hundreds of football shirts to English soccer fans in Rwanda, Africa. [...] Tom Bell, Managing Director, TNT Express Services UK & Ireland, said: “We already have strong links with Africa and are major backers of the United Nations’ World Food Programme’s efforts in Tanzania. Whenever we’re there, we see how much football can unite people from different nations.
Birmingham Post
Hunger in the news
26 February 2009

Nepal: Food prices to be volatile in 2009

Food prices in Nepal will continue to remain volatile in 2009 if cost drivers which were responsible for the high prices last year persist, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) said. Domestic cost drivers which caused prices to rise by as much as 40 percent on some food stuffs in 2008 were bandhs and blockades, high transportation costs and transport syndicates. The year-on-year food and beverage inflation in Nepal was approximately 17 percent compared to India's inflation rate of approximately 10 percent. "Global food prices and, more importantly, prices in India will also have an impact on food prices in Nepal," said Richard Ragan, WFP country director.
Kantipur Online
Hunger in the news
26 February 2009

Russia donates food worth 1 million dollars to Zimbabwe

The Russian Federation has donated a planeload of cooking oil and wheat flour worth 1 million U.S. dollars to Zimbabwe through the United Nations' World Food Program, local media reported on Thursday. Russia also pledged to provide a further 2 million dollars worth of food aid in due course, according to Russian Ambassador to Zimbabwe Sergey Kryukov.
Xinhua
Hunger in the news
26 February 2009

200,000 Somali Children Malnourished

Thousands of Somalis are suffering from malnutrition, a lack of clean water and poor sanitation conditions, putting Somali children at particularly high risk, a United Nations report says. The U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs cautions that Somalis could become more vulnerable to waterborne diseases, which are responsible for a fifth of the deaths among children under the age of five in Somalia. Some 200,000 Somalia children are “acutely malnourished” and a quarter of them are in need of immediate treatment in order to survive, OCHA says. [...] The U.N says three million Somalis, nearly a third of the population, will remain dependent on humanitarian assistance this year. “We’re seeing a continued deterioration of the nutrition situation in Somalia in certain areas,” said Marcus Prior, a spokesman for the World Food Programme (WFP). “I was in Somalia in December in a town on the border with Ethiopia where the nearest proper clinic was 70 kilometers away, with very little option to get there other than by foot,” he told The Media Line. A newly elected president in Somalia could bring positive developments and greater stability, but Marcus said the situation was still difficult.
The Media Line
Hunger in the news
26 February 2009

Spending wisely

There will be push-back, a tendency to try to cast the reforms as cold-hearted. But there is an undeniable logic to the Conservative government's decision to focus Canada's foreign aid on fewer countries, down to 20, and to shift the emphasis to the Americas where Canada can and should play more of a leadership role. Already, critics have weighed in with lamentations that the shift could hurt the poorest of the poor in Africa. However, the Canadian International Development Agency remains a large contributor to international relief agencies, such as the United Nations World Food Program, and African countries remain well represented on the list of 20, which includes Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Senegal, Sudan and Tanzania. It is false to suggest that continent has been abandoned.
Globe and Mail (Canada)

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