WFP responds to government request for food aid for Jakarta flood victims

Published on 02 July 2007

At the request of the Indonesian authorities, WFP has started providing immediate food aid to people displaced by floods in the capital.

At the request of the Indonesian authorities, WFP has started providing immediate food aid to people displaced by floods in the capital.

The World Food Programme stands ready to help more of the worst-affected people who have had to endure the flooding of their houses and neighbourhoods

Mohamed Saleheen, WFP Country Director for Indonesia

WFP dispatched an initial shipment of 526 boxes of micronutrient-enriched noodles and 702 boxes of high energy biscuits for residents of one of the worst hit districts.

WFP trucks and personnel is transporting this targeted food assistance for flood victims in the designated area and will remain on standby for further delivery of additional resources as new requests for assistance are made.

Government co-operation

“The World Food Programme stands ready to help more of the worst-affected people who have had to endure the flooding of their houses and neighbourhoods,” said Mohamed Saleheen, WFP Country Director for Indonesia.

“With yesterday’s request from the Government, and working in close co-operation with Government agencies, we can immediately begin providing ready-to-eat foods for distribution to the victims.”

The WFP food aid will be delivered immediately to an estimated 2,250 flood victims in Tangerang, sub-district Ciledug, in south Jakarta.

Rapid assessment team

WFP is prepared to offer additional food as required as part of the overall Government-coordinated and managed relief effort, and as further areas and caseloads requiring assistance are identified.

WFP and other UN agencies based in Jakarta have formed a rapid assessment team to determine further immediate needs of persons displaced by the flooding and available UN resources and supplies that can be provided to the Indonesian authorities, as required.

As of 5 February, flooding in greater Jakarta had killed at least 40 persons and forced about 300,000 persons from their homes in the capital city and its surroundings a