WFP supports BBC in school twinning initiative

Published on 23 September 2005

WFP has joined forces with the BBC to promote partnership and dialogue between school children in Africa and Britain.

WFP has joined forces with the BBC to promote partnership and dialogue between school children in Africa and Britain.

WFP has used its contacts with African schools in Lesotho, Malawi, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and the Democratic Republic of Congo to facilitate “school twinning” arrangements between Africa and Britain.

The BBC “World Class” initiative is seeking to twin 1000 British schools with partners across the African continent.

Direct route

So far more than 1600 British schools have come forward looking for links to African schools. With its extensive contacts built through school feeding programmes across Africa, WFP has offered a direct route to head teachers in remote areas of the continent and help the BBC to meet its target.

The BBC, working in conjunction with the British Council, will seek to link the British schools with counterparts in Africa, helping them to establish an appropriate channel of communication and establish a dialogue between the two.

Share experiences

The BBC says its “World Class” initiative will develop relationships, enrich learning and enhance understanding between school children in Britain and Africa. Schools participating in the twinning programme will be encouraged to share their experiences and celebrate the culture of the countries they come from.

For millions of children in Africa, WFP’s school feeding programmes are vital.

They provide children with a meal that helps them concentrate in lessons, develop physically and mentally, and lifts part of the burden of care from parents who often struggle to feed their families. In 2004, WFP, with help from its partners, enabled 16.6 million children in 72 countries around the world to go to school.

10 pence a day

School feeding programmes involve far more than food.

They engage parents and communities in the promotion of public health, education and the creation of an independent future. At an average cost of around 10 pence a day (U.S. 19 cents), WFP’s Global School Feeding Programme is a bargain.