On the Road: North Korea

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Lena Savelli offers us a rare glimpse inside the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), a country off limits to all but a handful of foreign visitors every year. The imposing monuments of Pyongyang belie the country's harsh living conditions, which have left one in three women and children prey to chronic hunger. Lena takes us from the port where WFP food aid arrives from around the world to the specialized clinics where malnourished children are brought in for treatment.

Now playing: Braving the North Korean Winter
Now playing: From Container Port to "Super Food"
Now playing: Touching down in Pyongyang
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1. Braving the North Korean Winter

28 Jun 2010

2. From Container Port to "Super Food"

10 Jun 2010

3. Touching down in Pyongyang

10 Jun 2010
You're on the road with:

Lena Savelli

Public Information Officer, Donor Relations

Passionate about both humanitarianism and food, joining WFP has been a good fit which has kept me On the Road for the past 8 years on 4 continents. When visiting new places I tend to look for the familiar in the unknown and light moments in tough situations.

Braving the North Korean Winter

Lena braves icy roads and sub-zero temperatures to visit orphanages and child hospitals outside Pyongyang where malnourished children are given hot meals and nutritional supplements provided by WFP. North Korea's unforgiving "weather gods" eventually prevail, forcing Lena and her government escort back to the city.

From Container Port to "Super Food"

Lena heads to Nampho port where most of WFP food assistance arrives. From there the cereals, oils and milk powders are shipped to a network of factories run by the North Korean government, where they are blended and fortified with nutrients. The finished product, a special rice milk blend, will be shipped around the country and fed to children suffering from malnutrition.

Touching down in Pyongyang

Lena touches down in Sunan Airport in Pyongyang. A wintery scene outside the airplane window offers one explanation for why it's so hard to grow food in North Korea. After a drive past the capital city's main monuments, Lena arrives at her guest house to find that something most of us take for granted every day is missing.

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