Purchase for Progress


Purchase for Progress
purchase_for_progress

“Through P4P I have learned more about grain quality and how I can make farming into my business. Now agriculture helps me and my family earn more income than before ” says Hadija Yusuph, a P4P-supported farmer from Tanzania.

Connecting farmers to markets

The Purchase for Progress (P4P) pilot has allowed WFP to try out new ways of leveraging its purchasing power to support agricultural and market development in developing countries. Over the past five years, the pilot has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of farmers, especially women, in 20 developing countries, supporting them to grow more, sell more, and earn more and become more competitive players in their local markets.

P4P links WFP’s demand for staple food commodities (cereals, pulses and blended foods) with the technical expertise of a wide range of partners to support smallholder farmers boost their agricultural production and sell their surplus at a fair price. By providing a market to smallholder farmers and supporting them to improve crop quality and increase their sales to WFP as well as other buyers, the initiative has transformed WFP’s local procurement into a vital tool to address hunger.

Though the five-year P4P pilot period concluded in December 2013, efforts to support smallholders continue as WFP mainstreams key innovations and best practices. WFP is committed to continue its support to smallholder farmers and is mainstreaming key innovations and best practices. These efforts support the Secretary-General’s Zero Hunger Challenge and WFP’s global effort to help smallholders to access markets, addressing food insecurity and poverty. Learn more

P4P latest

Empowering women farmers through literacy training

Rural women in developing countries often lack basic literacy skills, making it difficult for women farmers to benefit from training activities which could improve their agricultural production and increase their incomes. Because of this, in many pilot countries, P4P has incorporated basic reading and writing skills into training in order to promote their participation.

Improving links between smallholder farmers and school feeding programmes

Home Grown School Feeding programmes implemented by governments with the support of partners, including WFP, are increasingly providing assured markets for smallholder farmers. At least half of the 20 P4P pilot countries report linking smallholder farmers’ organizations to school feeding programmes. By strengthening government ownership and fostering community engagement, this should enhance sustainability.

5 facts about linking smallholder farmers to markets in Burkina Faso

P4P has assisted smallholders in Burkina Faso to improve post-harvest handling, increase yields and improve crop quality. This has enabled farmers’ organizations to market their surplus to private sector and institutional markets. Continue reading to learn five facts about progress made in Burkina Faso.

P4P promoting increased access to micronutrient-rich crops

In Rwanda, Uganda and Zambia, P4P is collaborating with HarvestPlus and national governments to increase the availability of micronutrient-rich staple foods. In these countries, P4P-supported smallholders have begun to cultivate Iron Beans, Vitamin A Maize and Vitamin A Sweet Potato, benefitting from improved nutrition and increased incomes from selling their produce, which is then used as seed or in school meals programmes.