Cargill to Support 30,000 Indonesian Children through WFP for Nutrition, Health and Education Programme

Published on 10 July 2007

Cargill has announced that it has committed US$3 million over three years in its global partnership with WFP to fund programmes to improve education and health and nutritional levels among school-age children in Bogor (West Java) and Madura (East Java).

Cargill announced today that it has committed US$3 million over three years in its global partnership with WFP to fund programmes to improve education and health and nutritional

Through Cargill, we are reaching some of the neediest children in an integrated way, complementing WFP’s traditional school feeding with health and hygiene interventions
WFP Asia Regional Director, Anthony Banbury

levels among school-age children in Bogor (West Java) and Madura (East Java).

“This programme is anticipated to benefit over 30,000 school children per year in 140 schools in Bogor and Madura,” said Paul Conway, President of Cargill Asia Pacific.

Package

Cargill’s collaboration with WFP focuses on an integrated package of activities, which consists of providing food assistance and medication for intestinal worms for the children attending the schools, construction of over 125 water wells which will provide them with access to safe drinking water at their schools and the promotion of good health and hygiene habits.

“We are extremely grateful for Cargill’s support in Indonesia. Through Cargill, we are reaching some of the neediest children in an integrated way, complementing WFP’s traditional school feeding with health and hygiene interventions. With Cargill’s generous contribution, WFP’s impact will be so much greater,” said WFP Asia Regional Director, Anthony Banbury.

Poor hygiene

In some schools, particularly those in arid and semi-arid areas, the sanitary situation is serious. Scarcity of water, poor hygiene and a total lack of latrines often lead to the development of parasites in children.

The presence of intestinal worms drastically reduces a child’s ability to absorb nutrients.

The impact to the overall health of a child by combining food with complementary activities, such as de-worming, are considerable, making them more resistant to other infections in addition to improving their nutritional status.

Fight against poverty

The programme is essential to the Government of Indonesia’s commitment to fight poverty, hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition, and to increase the health and educational levels of Indonesian children.

The initiative is also expected to contribute to increased rates of school enrolment and attendance, improve academic performance and reduce gender disparity in primary schools.

WFP’s current operation aims to support some 2.1 million people in Indonesia, where it provides nutritional assistance to vulnerable women and children, implements school feeding and helps the poorest improve their livelihoods.

Commitment

“The programme we are launching today represents Cargill’s commitment to WFP, this country and to the people of Indonesia.

We will continue to do what we can to bring about positive development in Indonesia in a socially and environmentally friendly manner. We are happy to have the World Food Programme as our partner in this endeavour. Indonesia has potential for a great future, and Cargill wants to be part of that future,” said Conway.

This is one of several WFP projects supported by Cargill since 2003, including food, nutrition and education programs in Cuba, Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala and Cote d’Ivoire.