UN World Food Programme

Kenya and Somalia flood overview

Attacks by crocodiles and snakes, disease from over-flowing latrines and hunger are just some of the challenges facing flood victims in parts of Kenya and Somalia following what are reportedly the heaviest rains in years.

Attacks by crocodiles and snakes, disease from over-flowing latrines and hunger are just some of the challenges facing flood victims in parts of Kenya and Somalia following what are reportedly the heaviest rains in years.

As part of its emergency response, WFP launched a massive US$11.4 million, three-month air operation this week to help marooned people who have fled their homes and left their possessions.

Civil war

Although exact figures are unknown, over 700,000 people may be affected by the floods in Somalia and Kenya – a figure which is expected to rise.

In Somalia, years of civil war damaging infrastructure has made the country one of the most difficult places in the world to deliver food aid.

The floods in the south-central area have exacerbated the problem by washing away roads and bridges.

Cholera fears

WFP has delivered over 6000 tonnes of food to some 180,000 beneficiaries in six affected districts in Somalia since 17th October.

Marooned villages in Kenya are reporting that they have little or no food left, no access to clean water and sanitation problems which have prompted fears of a cholera outbreak.

Stop-gap measure

WFP has food stocks until mid-December in the northern Dadaab refugee camp, but refugees have been displaced, lost cooking pots and firewood is scarce.

WFP is providing high-energy biscuits as a stop-gap measure.

With flooding expected to continue and also affecting Ethiopia, WFP will use fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters to transport aid workers and humanitarian assistance to victims while road access is still difficult.