UN World Food Programme

Sheryl Crow helps UN World Food Programme

Singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow is donating money raised from the sale of the first-ever images of her newly adopted son to the UN World Food Programme.

Singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow is donating money raised from the sale of the first-ever images of her newly adopted son to the UN World Food Programme.

WFP plans to use the proceeds from three-week-old Wyatt Steven Crow's firstever photo shoot to help feed school children in the poverty-stricken southern Africa country of Lesotho.

WFP's school feeding programme provides a daily nutritious meal to nearly 150,000 school kids in Lesotho, many of them orphans. After five years of drought, it is estimated that disease and malnutrition in Lesotho claim the lives of one in 12 children before they reach the age of five.

Inspired

Crow was inspired to help WFP's fight against child hunger after watching WFP Ambassador against Hunger Drew Barrymore's recent interview on CNN .

I was so struck by this story that our relationship with the WFP was born

Sheryl Crow blog

Writing for her website blog, Crow describes how she and her newly adopted son Wyatt learned about "an amazing organization called the World Food Programme" after hearing actress/producer Barrymore talk about her new role as a WFP Ambassador against Hunger to CNN presenter Wolf Blitzer.

"Humanitarian"

"Wyatt is now a humanitarian!" says The Grammy-winning Crow, known for such hits as "All I Wanna Do," "Soak Up the Sun," and "If It Makes You Happy".

"Because he and I happened to catch an interview with Drew Barrymore on the Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer about this organization, we were inspired to get involved with the WFP."

In an exclusive interview published in this week's OK! Magazine, the 45-year-old Crow says she sent an email to Barrymore offering to help WFP: "It is absolutely amazing, the number of kids that they feed. They have an unbelievable spokesperson in Drew."

School feeding

During her CNN interview, Barrymore, appointed as Ambassador against Hunger on May 9, gives a moving account of her recent visit to WFP-supported school feeding projects in Kenya.

Crow writes: "In a nutshell, this United Nations non-profit organization feeds millions of starving children at schools in third world countries as an incentive for them to attend school, which in turn might better their futures. They do so much more but I was so struck by this story."

By providing nutritious meals to over 20 million school children in 71 countries, WFP's school feeding programme ensures a child's healthy development and education and gives hope for the future.

Crow's blog encourages readers to visit the WFP website to make an online donation. For just US$21, WFP can feed a child in school for a year.