Thank You, Teachers, for Helping Us Spread the Word about Fighting Hunger

Published on 10 October 2013
For nearly a decade, World Teachers' Day has celebrated the great educators who help to inspire students and shape their futures. Copyright: WFP/Rein Skullerud

There is nothing like a good teacher. Teachers help us find our passions, set our goals and broaden our horizons. On 5 October, the world celebrated educators with World Teachers' Day.

Around the world, many children walk miles each way to school. This arduous trek to an education could prove even tougher for students if it weren’t for the amazing teachers in their classrooms. Teachers can shape our futures. They help to inspire us, and the things we learn in the classroom often become our greatest interests throughout our lives.

Since 1994, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has celebrated World Teachers’ Day, a day focused on appreciation of work and discussion of issues facing the world’s educators. The International Labour Organization, UNICEF, UNDP and Education International have partnered with UNESCO to honor educators around the world.

Amazing teachers around the world are hugely important to WFP. By raising awareness and engaging students in the fight against hunger, teachers can help WFP build a new generation of advocates. Some teachers have already begun to do so.

Take Mohamed Kaddour. The English professor in a Parisian suburb thought up a project to help raise money for WFP by making calendars. His class of electronics students created and sold over 300 calendars. During the busy season, students often put in weekend hours to makes sales. In the end, they raised enough money to feed over 2,600 hungry school children.

Another great example is Tim Coleman, a service learning teacher at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Day School in Washington, DC. Coleman used a unique tool to encourage students to think critically about hunger issues: advertising. Small groups of middle-school students worked on creating an advertising campaign for WFP, and the results were creative and engaged the students. Coleman’s lesson is now a WFP teaching resource. Find it here.

Examples like these show that the fight against hunger often begins in the classroom. Are you teaching your classes about hunger? Share your story with wfp.youth@wfp.org