Assistance to Ivorian Refugees in Ghana

About this Operation

Budget Revisions

Resource Situation

This operation has been modified as per budget revision 3 (see below)

Protracted political crisis in Cote d’Ivoire since 2010 resulted in a humanitarian crisis that led to the influx of thousands of asylum seekers into Ghana. Three years after the crisis began, 9,000 Ivorian refugees still reside in Ghana, 8,500 of them inhabiting three refugee camps in the Brong-Ahafo, Central and Western regions. An October 2013 joint assessment mission (JAM) by United Nations agencies, Government and donor partners indicated that almost all refugees were unwilling to return to Cote d’Ivoire in the near future due to the political situation and continuing security concerns.  

Most of the refugees fled Cote d’Ivoire with no assets or money. Since May 2011, they have benefited from WFP food assistance under Emergency Operation 200321 (EMOP) ended in January 2014. Host communities have supported the Ivorian refugees, but that support has declined with time due to diminishing resources. Most refugees who settled in host communities have now relocated to the camps. The October 2013 joint assessment mission (JAM) and September 2013 participatory assessment organized by UNHCR and partners indicated that food is the refugees’ most pressing need, followed by shelter and education.

In line with the 2014–2017 WFP Strategic Plan, the PRRO seeks to: save lives by meeting refugees’ food security and nutrition requirements (Strategic Objective 1 “Save lives and protect livelihoods in emergencies”); and provide food assistance ensuring refugees’ household food security and preventing negative coping strategies during the transition to self-reliance (Strategic Objective 2 “Support food security and nutrition and rebuild livelihoods in fragile settings following emergencies”).

The PRRO also addresses Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 1 “Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger”.


Budget revision 3 proposes a six-month extension to PRRO 200675 (PRRO) from April to September 2015 to provide continued support to 8,593 Ivorian refugees in three refugee camps in Ghana.