First WFP food aid ship arrives in Somali port of Mogadishu in more than a decade

Published on 09 April 2006

A ship chartered by WFP docked yesterday in Mogadishu – the agency’s first delivery in the capital’s port in more than a decade.

A ship chartered by WFP docked yesterday in Mogadishu – the agency’s first delivery in the capital’s port in more than a decade.

The reopening of the port makes it easier for us to reach more than one million people across the country who rely on our assistance

WFP Somalia Acting Country Director Leo van der Velden

The MV Redline docked at Mogadishu port on Sunday loaded with 3,300 metric tons of WFP food – 2,400 tons of cereals, 780 tons of pulses, 90 tons of highly nutritious blended food and 30 tons of vegetable oil.

The food will be trucked to the drought stricken regions of Bay and Bakool in the south.

Warlords

Rival claims by competing warlords closed Mogadishu port in February 1995 until the Union of Islamic Courts seized the capital in June. The port was reopened to shipping in August.

“Mogadishu is once again a key entry point for getting food stocks into the country. The reopening of the port makes it easier for us to reach more than one million people across the country who rely on our assistance,” said WFP Somalia Acting Country Director Leo van der Velden.

“It should also bode well for the peace and stability that Somalia needs,” he said.

Facilitating supply

Van der Velden said that using the country’s largest port should reduce unloading times and help ease logistical problems that have complicated WFP’s supply lines into Somalia over the past 10 years.

With Mogadishu closed to shipping, WFP-chartered ships had to unload their cargo at beach ports near the capital and at the port of Merka to the south.

Cranes unloaded the food commodities from ships onto smaller barges, which then ferried them to the shallows, where porters waited to wade ashore with the bags.

Van den Velden said WFP was discussing with Mogadishu’s newly appointed port management the use of WFP food in return for work to clean up the facility after years of disuse.

Pirates

A spate of pirate attacks in Somali waters in 2005 forced WFP to bring food aid to the drought-stricken south by road because shipping companies were unwilling to risk voyages to Somalia.

Two WFP-chartered ships were seized by pirates in 2005 and one escaped a pirate attack in March 2006.

Although the recent harvest has provided a respite for some people in Somalia, many families are still struggling to recover from last year’s devastating drought.

Insecurity

An interagency assessment completed in August on the outcome of the March-June Gu main rains found that 1.4 million people in North, central or southern Somalia face either an acute food and livelihood security crisis or humanitarian emergency until at least the end of December 2006.

In addition, 400,000 internally displaced people need prolonged humanitarian assistance.

Up until the Gu rains assessment, WFP assisted a total of 1.3 million people in Somalia, where it has 11 offices.

Most distributions are emergency relief for families whose livelihoods have been destroyed by drought.

Other activities include supplementary feeding for malnourished children, school feeding, food for work, and food for training and rehabilitation.

WFP needs a total of US$37 million to assist 1.1 million people in Somalia until July 2007.